All Saints Day

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A LIST of Saints canonized in 2016 the act of canonization is reserved to the Holy See and occurs at the conclusion of a long process requiring extensive proof that the person proposed for canonization lived and died in such an exemplary and holy way that he or she is worthy to be recognized as a saint. The Church’s official recognition of sanctity implies that the persons are now in heavenly glory, that they may be publicly invoked and mentioned officially in the liturgy of the Church, most especially in the Litany of the Saints.

Stanisław Papczyński: (18 May 1631 – 17 September 1701), born Jan Papczyński, was a Polish Roman Catholic priest who once served as a member of the Piarist Order. He went on to found the Marian Fathers, the first Polish religious order for men, that was also known as the Marians of the Immaculate Conception; he would assume the name of “Stanislaus of Jesus and Mary”. Papczyński is widely remembered as a prolific religious writer; his writings include works such as “The Mystical Temple of God”.

Maria Elizabeth Hesselblad: (4 June 1870 – 24 April 1957), was a Swedish nurse who was a convert to the Roman Catholic Church and founded a new form of life of the Bridgettines known as the Bridgettine Sisters. She was a professed member of the Bridgettine order.

Teresa of Calcutta: (26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997) known in the Catholic Church as Saint Teresa of Calcutta (born Anjezë Gonxhe Bojaxhiu Albanian: [aˈɲɛzə
ˈɡɔndʒɛ bɔjaˈdʒiu]; 26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997), was an Albanian-IndianRoman Catholic nun and missionary. In 1950, Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation, which in 2012 consisted of over 4,500 sisters and was active in 133 countries. They run homes for people dying of HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis; soup kitchens; dispensaries and mobile clinics; children’s and family counselling programmes; orphanages; and schools.

José Gabriel del Rosario Brochero: (16 March 1840 – 26 January 1914) was a Roman Catholic Argentinian priest who suffered leprosy throughout his life. He is known for his extensive work with the poor and the sick. He became affectionately known as “the Gaucho priest” and the “cowboy priest”.

José Sánchez del Río: (28 March 1913 – 10 February 1928) was a Mexican Cristero who was put to death by government officials because he refused to renounce his Catholic faith. His death was seen as a largely political venture on the part of government officials in their attempt to stamp out dissent and crush religious freedom in the area. He was dubbed as “Joselito”.

Manuel González García: (25 February 1877 – 4 January 1940) was a Spanish bishop of the Roman Catholic Church who served as the Bishop of Palencia from 1935 until his death. He was also the founder of the Eucharistic Missionaries of Nazareth and also established both the Disciples of Saint John and the Children of Reparation. He was known for his strong devotion to the Eucharist and became known as the “Bishop of the Tabernacle” due to this devotion; he made it an objective of his to spread devotion to the Eucharist and encouraged frequent reception of it.

Elizabeth of the Trinity: born Élisabeth Catez (18 July 1880 – 9 November 1906), was a French Discalced Carmelite professed religious in addition to being a mystic and a spiritual writer. She was known for the depth of her spiritual growth as a Carmelite as well as bleak periods in which her religious calling was perceived to be unsure according to those around her; she however was acknowledged for her persistence in pursuing the will of God and in devoting herself to the charism of the Carmelites.

Alfonso Maria Fusco: (23 March 1839 – 6 February 1910) was a Roman Catholic priest and the founder of the Sisters of Saint John the Baptist – also known as the Baptistine Sisters. Their mission was to evangelize and educate as well as to promote the faith amongst adolescents with a particular emphasis on those who were poor or abandoned.

Lodovico Pavoni: (11 September 1784 – 1 April 1849) was an Italian Roman Catholic priest who administered in Brescia where he lived.[1] He paid close attention to the needs of males and was concerned with their education. He was to establish – in 1825 – his own religious congregation to assist in his mission: the Sons of Mary Immaculate which came to be known also as the “Pavoniani”

Salomone Leclercq: (15 November 1745 – 2 September 1792) – born Guillaume-Nicolas-Louis Leclercq – was a French Roman Catholic professed religious who was killed during the French Revolution for his refusal to swear an oath of allegiance to the new government. Leclercq assumed the religious name of “Salomone” after he was admitted as a professed member of the De La Salle Brothers.

Triduum of All Hallows

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This is  recycled from a few years back:

Sometimes it is hard to think of Halloween as the start of a Christian Triduum, but it is. It is the beginning of Hallomas and the eve of All Saints Day , which is followed by All Souls Day. Halloween many times takes on the feeling of paganism, and its customs and solstice link do indeed trace back to many pre-Christian festivities. Christians were not the first to be concerned with the spirits or souls of the departed. Halloween as commemorated reflects much of the incorporation of ancient festivals with Christian beliefs. Commercialism too, has shaped this modern holiday just as it has distorted Christmas into a shopping season, and Saint Patrick’s day into a celebration of alcohol.

Many times Hallomas ends on its first day, Halloween. It is the costumes and parties and candies that are advertised; and it is the remembrance of the deceased that is forgotten. The traditional belief of Halloween is that the veil between the material and spiritual world becomes thin. Oddly that day of candy from a religious standpoint was traditionally a day of fasting. Halloween borrows from many traditions around the world though so it is easy to see how that fast got misplaced. It also east to see how, especially in northern climates how this day is associated with the thinning of the veil between life and death. It is the transition of the long days of light to the dark days of winter. It is the trees shedding their leaves. It is the harvesting of the last harvest of the season. It is the cycle of life that is so visible in most northern European climates. One only has to look around to see how that veil is thinned. That change in nature does take on its own spiritual quality and the commercial and pedestrian celebration of Halloween is a festive acknowledgement of that change. But if one only celebrates that end of fall or change of season, Halloween becomes dead as winter. Halloween is not the celebration, it is after all just the beginning of the celebration.

Halloween translates to “the eve of All Saints day” where the church celebrates all saints. It acknowledges all of those faithful who have led exemplary lives. It is a day of remembrance for those who have not been canonized, or for those who do not have a recognized day of their own. It is a day for famous, and those known only by a few family members. It is that celebration of the communion of saints, a day to ask for those saints to intercede for us, to pray for us, and us to offer our prayers and petitions to them. It is a day dedicated to saints,the holy innocents, and martyrs. It is a day of church triumphant. It is good to remember those who have been triumphant on their journey, those who have had a bountiful harvest and who were victorious over “the evil spirits” that are so humorously portrayed on Halloween.

The third day of All Hallows pays tribute to the souls that perhaps stumbled a bit on their journey. Those that perhaps did not make all of the right choices, the ones that were perhaps tricked in life. All Souls day is one for those that struggle and the consolation that even a sinner is loved. It is a day devoted to those souls in purgatory, those that hope to be raised to heaven and those who depend on our prayers and intercessions.

The Triduum is a look at  all souls, all the faithful departed whether saints or sinners, serious topics thankfully lightened by a very festive celebration; but it is easy to get tricked into ignoring these souls while being bribed by candy. In that Halloween phrase “trick or treat”, perhaps there is an echo of both the day of all saints and souls; it is the saints that did not fall for life’s tricks, while perhaps some souls were a bit to attached to the treats that they lost sight of the perils. The disguises of Halloween do after all mimic the disguises and deceptions of life. Art does indeed imitate life.Trick or treat can be rephrased to the more sober and biblical “I present to you a blessing and a curse.” Jack-O-Lanterns with their candles do illustrate body and soul and the procession of masked characters is a drama of the procession of life as most everyone eventually realizes their season for collecting treats has passed. Eventually one must pass from one side of the door to the other, from asking the questions to giving the replies or simply observing and growing in these seasons of life.

(note: I know the word triduum isn’t being used 100% correctly here, it is being used to draw similarly to the Easter triduum. I guess trilogy might have been the correct choice, but that word doesn’t have the same effect.)

Halloween

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Halloween is one of those odd liturgical days. It is sort of Christian and sort of pagan. The Christians can claim the day as the eve of all hallows day, also known as all saints day. It also has many pagan roots, and many are from the ancient paganism of the Roman Empire. Today though the day is often commandeered by the neo-pagan witches that are so common in these woods. For them this is the biggest day of their calendar year. Years ago it also was a big day for kids, something for them to eagerly look forward to. I think today though the parents have taken this day for themselves. For the kids, there is no longer running around the neighborhood trying to fill their sack to the brim with treats. Instead they are ushered to a safe zone for more structured activities. Oh, I understand the reason and it is a good though sad one; but that charm of the day has been lost. The Halloween I see for kids today is what I think of as the responsible secular day of entertainment. For this modern day it is about the costume, the candy, and the adult parties. For the witches, it is about grown up witch stuff I know nothing about. I assume though they take it quite seriously.

Gone though is All Hallows Eve, the eve of all saints day and all souls day that follows. In days long ago, this kids Halloween was always connected with the liturgical observances of all saints and all souls day. With those masses, that somewhat costumed celebration had meaning. Life, death, good evil, trickery, deception, masks, all reflected something real about life. Wandering house to house they were not given much thought; it was the church service that always brought reason to the customs of Halloween. It was the church service that reminded us that the day was not just a party simply for enjoyment. That was the old Halloween. The new day is that safe day, void of meaning, orchestrated by responsible secular adults, and propagated by the desire of merchants.

Perhaps it might be wise for responsible adults to give kids back their day, to reacquaint them with the history and customs of a true Halloween. That true Halloween still involves costumes and candy, but it also involves the Masses of All Saints and All Souls day. It also involves a bit of the history of those customs, and perhaps even a little bit of the history of some saints. The tradition of this day is too rich for some poor kid, dressed like a fool, to be dragged to a shopping mall so that they can collect some new age health conscious “treat.” Halloween is an important day, and it is a day rich in tradition and meaning; wouldn’t it be better to give a kid that rather than another granola bar? Trick or treat.

Triduum of All Hallows

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Sometimes it is hard to think of Halloween as the start of Christian Triduum, but it is. It is the beginning of Hallomas and the eve of All Saints Day , which is followed by All Souls Day. Halloween many times takes on the feeling of paganism, and its customs and solstice link do indeed trace back to many pre Christian festivities. Christians were not the first to be concerned with the spirits or souls of the departed. Halloween as commemorated reflects much of the incorporation of ancient festivals with Christian beliefs. Commercialism too, has shaped this modern holiday just as it has distorted Christmas into a shopping season, and Saint Patrick’s day into a celebration of alcohol.

Many times Hallomas ends on its first day, Halloween. It is the costumes and parties and candies that are advertised; and it is the remembrance of the deceased that is forgotten. The traditional belief of Halloween is that the veil between the material and spiritual world becomes thin. Oddly that day of candy from a religious standpoint was traditionally a day of fasting. Halloween borrows from many traditions around the world though so it is easy to see how that fast got misplaced. It also east to see how, especially in northern climates how this day is associated with the thinning of the veil between life and death. It is the transition of the long days of light to the dark days of winter. It is the trees shedding their leaves. It is the harvesting of the last harvest of the season. It is the cycle of life that is so visible in most northern European climates. One only has to look around to see how that veil is thinned. That change in nature does take on its own spiritual quality and the commercial and pedestrian celebration of Halloween is a festive acknowledgement of that change. But if one only celebrates that end of fall or change of season, Halloween becomes dead as winter. Halloween is not the celebration, it is after all just the beginning of the celebration.

Halloween translates to “the eve of All Saints day” where the church celebrates all saints. It acknowledges all of those faithful who have led exemplary lives. It is a day of remembrance for those who have not been canonized, or for those who do not have a recognized day of their own. It is a day for famous, and those known only by a few family members. It is that celebration of the communion of saints, a day to ask for those saints to intercede for us, to pray for us, and us to offer our prayers and petitions to them. It is a day dedicated to saints,the holy innocents, and martyrs. It is a day of church triumphant. It is good to remember those who have been triumphant on their journey, those who have had a bountiful harvest and who were victorious over “the evil spirits” that are so humorously portrayed on Halloween.

The third day of All Hallows pays tribute to the souls that perhaps stumbled a bit on their journey. Those that perhaps did not make all of the right choices, the ones that were perhaps tricked in life. All Souls day is one for those that struggle and the consolation that even a sinner is loved. It is a day devoted to those souls in purgatory, those that hope to be raised to heaven and those who depend on our prayers and intercessions.

The Triduum is a look at  all souls, all the faithful departed whether saints or sinners, serious topics thankfully lightened by a very festive celebration; but it is easy to get tricked into ignoring these souls while being bribed by candy. In that Halloween phrase “trick or treat”, perhaps there is an echo of both the day of all saints and souls; it is the saints that did not fall for life’s tricks, while perhaps some souls were a bit to attached to the treats that they lost sight of the perils. The disguises of Halloween do after all mimic the disguises and deceptions of life. Art does indeed imitate life.Trick or treat can be rephrased to the more sober and biblical “I present to you a blessing and a curse.” Jack-O-Lanterns with their candles do illustrate body and soul and the procession of masked characters is a drama of the procession of life as most everyone eventually realizes their season for collecting treats has passed. Eventually one must pass from one side of the door to the other, from asking the questions to giving the replies or simply observing and growing in these seasons of life.