Come after me 2

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What is astounding about the gospels describing Jesus’s healings around Galilee is their decisiveness. When he heals at the synagogue, he does so with authority; and it is that same authority which he calls the disciples to follow him. There is no long discussion describing the diagnosis of the illness, any more than there is a discussion with the disciples when they are called. In calling the disciples and in healing, that presence of authority is unmistakable. The area around Galilee is reported to have both devout followers of Moses and Greek gentiles, though the two healings described were associated with the Jewish citizens with one at that synagogue, and the other Simons mother in law. It will be later when he heals the gentiles of that same area. In thinking about the authority which Jesus calls his disciples and heals those people, somehow that area of Galilee with its varied cultures becomes important. It is not arguing with scholars at a temple, but instead is healing in a complex community so much like todays. Like the culture clashes between Jew and Greek and Roman, there is that same variation between todays liberals and conservatives and capitalists and protestants and Jews and Catholics and Muslims and Buddhists and Hindus and Unitarian Universalists and atheists and wiccans secular humanists. They are difficult communities to navigate and ambivalence or indecision are hazardous to those trying to navigate to that kingdom Jesus preached. The abrupt command to follow him, and the decisive healings are what were needed to guide his disciples. That necessity of trust and commitment is conveyed by the gospel writers language. Little information is given except that command to come after me, and that Jesus healed those who did. Jesus did command them, just as Moses delivered those commandments from God. The reason for Jesus’s commandment plainly was so that one might be healed. Come after me, and you will be healed. Plain and simple.
mk 1:21-28
mk 1:29-39

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